First advent

Die schönen Madchen sind nicht schon,
Die warmen Hande sind so kalt...

Pulp Fiction (1994) / Breaking Bad (2008-2013) visual parallels. (credit)

(Source: gusfringg, via ldiditforme)

— 8 hours ago with 2281 notes

I don’t know why he saved my life. Maybe in those last moments he loved life more than he ever had before. Not just his life - anybody’s life; my life. All he’d wanted were the same answers the rest of us want. Where did I come from? Where am I going? How long have I got? All I could do was sit there and watch him die.

(Source: jackswhites, via ldiditforme)

— 11 hours ago with 1157 notes
greuze:

William Adolphe Bouguereau, Jeanne (Detail), 1888

greuze:

William Adolphe Bouguereau, Jeanne (Detail), 1888

(via phobs-heh)

— 11 hours ago with 996 notes

The Monk skull collection in Agion Oros.

The Monk skull collection in Agion Oros.

(Source: mybeautifuldarktwistedface, via ancient-serpent)

— 1 day ago with 2581 notes
ancient-mesopotamia:

Gate of the Citadel of Sargon II, Dur Sharrukin (photo taken during excavation in 1840’s).  742-706 BCE.  Khorsabad, Iraq.

ancient-mesopotamia:

Gate of the Citadel of Sargon II, Dur Sharrukin (photo taken during excavation in 1840’s).  
742-706 BCE.  Khorsabad, Iraq.

(Source: sites.google.com, via ancient-serpent)

— 1 day ago with 1136 notes
#sargon 
likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus’s creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus’s creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

(via ancient-serpent)

— 1 day ago with 4346 notes
archaicwonder:

A pair of Egyptian glass eye inlays, Late Period, Circa 664-332 BC
Each eye rim of opaque blue glass, with extended cosmetic line, the white glass sclera fused with cloudy iridescent black oval irises, probably from a sarcophagus.

archaicwonder:

A pair of Egyptian glass eye inlays, Late Period, Circa 664-332 BC


Each eye rim of opaque blue glass, with extended cosmetic line, the white glass sclera fused with cloudy iridescent black oval irises, probably from a sarcophagus.

(Source: bonhams.com, via ancient-serpent)

— 1 day ago with 283 notes
chimneyfish:

Monreale, 1893
Jakub Schikaneder

chimneyfish:

Monreale, 1893

Jakub Schikaneder

(via ancient-serpent)

— 1 day ago with 510 notes